Hepatic ChREBP orchestrates intrahepatic carbohydrate metabolism to limit hepatic glucose 6-phosphate and glycogen accumulation in a mouse model for acute Glycogen Storage Disease type Ib

Abstract:

Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) is a glucose 6-phosphate (G6P)-sensitive transcription factor that acts as a metabolic switch to maintain intracellular glucose and phosphate homeostasis. Hepatic ChREBP is well-known for its regulatory role in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and de novo lipogenesis. The physiological role of ChREBP in hepatic glycogen metabolism and blood glucose regulation has not been assessed in detail, and ChREBP's contribution to carbohydrate flux adaptations in hepatic Glycogen Storage Disease type 1 (GSD I) requires further investigation.

SEEK ID: https://fairdomhub.org/publications/691

DOI: 10.1016/j.molmet.2023.101838

Projects: PoLiMeR - Polymers in the Liver: Metabolism and Regulation

Publication type: Journal

Journal: Molecular Metabolism

Citation: Molecular Metabolism 79:101838

Date Published: 2024

Registered Mode: by DOI

Authors: K.A. Krishnamurthy, M.G.S. Rutten, J.A. Hoogerland, T.H. van Dijk, T. Bos, M. Koehorst, M.P. de Vries, N.J. Kloosterhuis, H. Havinga, B.V. Schomakers, M. van Weeghel, J.C. Wolters, B.M. Bakker, M.H. Oosterveer

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Citation
Krishnamurthy, K. A., Rutten, M. G. S., Hoogerland, J. A., van Dijk, T. H., Bos, T., Koehorst, M., de Vries, M. P., Kloosterhuis, N. J., Havinga, H., Schomakers, B. V., van Weeghel, M., Wolters, J. C., Bakker, B. M., & Oosterveer, M. H. (2024). Hepatic ChREBP orchestrates intrahepatic carbohydrate metabolism to limit hepatic glucose 6-phosphate and glycogen accumulation in a mouse model for acute Glycogen Storage Disease type Ib. In Molecular Metabolism (Vol. 79, p. 101838). Elsevier BV. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2023.101838
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Created: 22nd Feb 2024 at 11:31

Last updated: 22nd Feb 2024 at 11:58

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