Cell size and morphological properties of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to growth temperature

Abstract:

Cell volume is an important parameter for modelling cellular processes. Temperature-induced variability of cellular size, volume, intracellular granularity, a fraction of budding cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113–7D (in anaerobic glucose unlimited batch cultures) were measured by flow cytometry and matched with the performance of the biomass growth (maximal specific growth rate (μmax), specific rate of glucose consumption, the rate of maintenance, biomass yield on glucose). The critical diameter of single cells was 7.94 μm and it is invariant at growth temperatures above 18.5°C. Below 18.5°C, it exponentially increases up to 10.2 μm. The size of the bud linearly depends on μmax, and it is between 50% at 5°C and 90% at 31°C of the averaged single cell. The intracellular granularity (side scatter channel (SSC)-index) negatively depends on μmax. There are two temperature regions (5–31°C vs. 33–40°C) where the relationship between SSC-index and various cellular parameters differ significantly. In supraoptimal temperature range (33–40°C), cells are less granulated perhaps due to a higher rate of the maintenance. There is temperature dependent passage through the checkpoints in the cell cycle which influences the μmax. The results point to the existence of two different morphological states of yeasts in these different temperature regions.

Citation: Cell size and morphological properties of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to growth temperature 18(6) : 603

Date Published: 26th Apr 2018

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Zakhartsev, M., & Reuss, M. (2018). Cell size and morphological properties of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to growth temperature. FEMS Yeast Research, 18(6). http://doi.org/10.1093/femsyr/foy052
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Created: 12th Jul 2018 at 21:12

Last updated: 12th Jul 2018 at 21:15

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