Publications

21 Publications visible to you, out of a total of 21

Abstract (Expand)

SABIO-RK (http://sabiork.h-its.org/) is a manually curated database containing data about biochemical reactions and their reaction kinetics. The data are primarily extracted from scientific literature and stored in a relational database. The content comprises both naturally occurring and alternatively measured biochemical reactions and is not restricted to any organism class. The data are made available to the public by a web-based search interface and by web services for programmatic access. In this update we describe major improvements and extensions of SABIO-RK since our last publication in the database issue of Nucleic Acid Research (2012). (i) The website has been completely revised and (ii) allows now also free text search for kinetics data. (iii) Additional interlinkages with other databases in our field have been established; this enables users to gain directly comprehensive knowledge about the properties of enzymes and kinetics beyond SABIO-RK. (iv) Vice versa, direct access to SABIO-RK data has been implemented in several systems biology tools and workflows. (v) On request of our experimental users, the data can be exported now additionally in spreadsheet formats. (vi) The newly established SABIO-RK Curation Service allows to respond to specific data requirements.

Authors: U. Wittig, M. Rey, A. Weidemann, R. Kania, W. Muller

Date Published: 4th Jan 2018

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract

Not specified

Authors: Wolfgang Müller, Meik Bittkowski, Martin Golebiewski, Renate Kania, Maja Rey, Andreas Weidemann, Ulrike Wittig

Date Published: 1st Mar 2017

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

Signaling through the AKT and ERK pathways controls cell proliferation. However, the integrated regulation of this multistep process, involving signal processing, cell growth and cell cycle progression, is poorly understood. Here, we study different hematopoietic cell types, in which AKT and ERK signaling is triggered by erythropoietin (Epo). Although these cell types share the molecular network topology for pro-proliferative Epo signaling, they exhibit distinct proliferative responses. Iterating quantitative experiments and mathematical modeling, we identify two molecular sources for cell type-specific proliferation. First, cell type-specific protein abundance patterns cause differential signal flow along the AKT and ERK pathways. Second, downstream regulators of both pathways have differential effects on proliferation, suggesting that protein synthesis is rate-limiting for faster cycling cells while slower cell cycles are controlled at the G1-S progression. The integrated mathematical model of Epo-driven proliferation explains cell type-specific effects of targeted AKT and ERK inhibitors and faithfully predicts, based on the protein abundance, anti-proliferative effects of inhibitors in primary human erythroid progenitor cells. Our findings suggest that the effectiveness of targeted cancer therapy might become predictable from protein abundance.

Authors: L. Adlung, S. Kar, M. C. Wagner, B. She, S. Chakraborty, J. Bao, S. Lattermann, M. Boerries, H. Busch, P. Wuchter, A. D. Ho, J. Timmer, M. Schilling, T. Hofer, U. Klingmuller

Date Published: 24th Jan 2017

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO). However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR) and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid) and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR). The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in erythroid progenitor cells unaffected. Thus, the proposed modeling strategy can be employed as a general procedure to identify cell type-specific parameters and to recommend treatment strategies for the selective targeting of specific cell types.

Authors: R. Merkle, B. Steiert, F. Salopiata, S. Depner, A. Raue, N. Iwamoto, M. Schelker, H. Hass, M. Wasch, M. E. Bohm, O. Mucke, D. B. Lipka, C. Plass, W. D. Lehmann, C. Kreutz, J. Timmer, M. Schilling, U. Klingmuller

Date Published: 6th Aug 2016

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from human bone marrow serve as a resource for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Clinical applications require standardized protocols according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) guidelines. Donor variability as well as the intrinsic heterogeneity of MSC populations must be taken into consideration. The composition of the culture medium is a key factor in successful MSC expansion. The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the efficiency of xeno-free human platelet lysate (HPL)-based cell expansion with two commercially available media-StemPro MSC SFM CTS (for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications) and MSCGM (non-GMP-compliant, for research only)-in an academic setting as the first optimization step toward GMP-compliant manufacturing. We report the feasibility of MSC expansion up to the yielded cell number with all three media. MSCs exhibited the typical fibroblastoid morphology, with distinct differences in cell size depending on the medium. The differentiation capacity and characteristic immunophenotype were confirmed for all MSC populations. Proliferation was highest using StemPro MSC SFM CTS, whereas HPL medium was more cost-effective and its composition could be adjusted individually according to the respective needs. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of GMP-compatible culture media for MSC expansion. Both StemPro and HPL medium proved to be suitable for clinical application and allowed sufficient cell proliferation. Specific differences were observed and should be considered according to the intended use. This study provides a detailed cost analysis and tools that may be helpful for the establishment of GMP-compliant MSC expansion.

Authors: P. Wuchter, M. Vetter, R. Saffrich, A. Diehlmann, K. Bieback, A. D. Ho, P. Horn

Date Published: 26th Feb 2016

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

In previous studies human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) maintained the "stemness" of human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) through direct cell-cell contact in two-dimensional co-culture systems. We establish a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system based on a custom-made chip, the 3(D)-KITChip, as an in vitro model system of the human hematopoietic stem cell niche. This array of up to 625 microcavities, with 300 mum size in each orientation, was inserted into a microfluidic bioreactor. The microcavities of the 3(D)-KITChip were inoculated with human bone marrow MSCs together with umbilical cord blood HPCs. MSCs used the microcavities as a scaffold to build a complex 3D mesh. HPCs were distributed three-dimensionally inside this MSC network and formed ss-catenin- and N-cadherin-based intercellular junctions to the surrounding MSCs. Using RT(2)-PCR and western blots, we demonstrate that a proportion of HPCs maintained the expression of CD34 throughout a culture period of 14 days. In colony-forming unit assays, the hematopoietic stem cell plasticity remained similar after 14 days of bioreactor co-culture, whereas monolayer co-cultures showed increasing signs of HPC differentiation and loss of stemness. These data support the notion that the 3D microenvironment created within the microcavity array preserves vital stem cell functions of HPCs more efficiently than conventional co-culture systems.

Authors: P. Wuchter, R. Saffrich, S. Giselbrecht, C. Nies, H. Lorig, S. Kolb, A. D. Ho, E. Gottwald

Date Published: 3rd Feb 2016

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

The same pathway, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, can produce different cellular responses, depending on stimulus or cell type. We examined the phosphorylation dynamics of the MAPK kinase MEK and its targets extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in primary hepatocytes and the transformed keratinocyte cell line HaCaT A5 exposed to either hepatocyte growth factor or interleukin-6. By combining quantitative mass spectrometry with dynamic modeling, we elucidated network structures for the reversible threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK in both cell types. In addition to differences in the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions, the HaCaT network model required two feedback mechanisms, which, as the experimental data suggested, involved the induction of the dual-specificity phosphatase DUSP6 and the scaffold paxillin. We assayed and modeled the accumulation of the double-phosphorylated and active form of ERK1/2, as well as the dynamics of the changes in the monophosphorylated forms of ERK1/2. Modeling the differences in the dynamics of the changes in the distributions of the phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 suggested that different amounts of MEK activity triggered context-specific responses, with primary hepatocytes favoring the formation of double-phosphorylated ERK1/2 and HaCaT A5 cells that produce both the threonine-phosphorylated and the double-phosphorylated form. These differences in phosphorylation distributions explained the threshold, sensitivity, and saturation of the ERK response. We extended the findings of differential ERK phosphorylation profiles to five additional cultured cell systems and matched liver tumor and normal tissue, which revealed context-specific patterns of the various forms of phosphorylated ERK.

Authors: N. Iwamoto, L. A. D'Alessandro, S. Depner, B. Hahn, B. A. Kramer, P. Lucarelli, A. Vlasov, M. Stepath, M. E. Bohm, D. Deharde, G. Damm, D. Seehofer, W. D. Lehmann, U. Klingmuller, M. Schilling

Date Published: 2nd Feb 2016

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

UNLABELLED: Modeling of dynamical systems using ordinary differential equations is a popular approach in the field of systems biology. Two of the most critical steps in this approach are to construct dynamical models of biochemical reaction networks for large datasets and complex experimental conditions and to perform efficient and reliable parameter estimation for model fitting. We present a modeling environment for MATLAB that pioneers these challenges. The numerically expensive parts of the calculations such as the solving of the differential equations and of the associated sensitivity system are parallelized and automatically compiled into efficient C code. A variety of parameter estimation algorithms as well as frequentist and Bayesian methods for uncertainty analysis have been implemented and used on a range of applications that lead to publications. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The Data2Dynamics modeling environment is MATLAB based, open source and freely available at http://www.data2dynamics.org. CONTACT: andreas.raue@fdm.uni-freiburg.de SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

Authors: A. Raue, B. Steiert, M. Schelker, C. Kreutz, T. Maiwald, H. Hass, J. Vanlier, C. Tonsing, L. Adlung, R. Engesser, W. Mader, T. Heinemann, J. Hasenauer, M. Schilling, T. Hofer, E. Klipp, F. Theis, U. Klingmuller, B. Schoberl, J. Timmer

Date Published: 1st Nov 2015

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

Signaling pathways are characterized by crosstalk, feedback and feedforward mechanisms giving rise to highly complex and cell-context specific signaling networks. Dissecting the underlying relations is crucial to predict the impact of targeted perturbations. However, a major challenge in identifying cell-context specific signaling networks is the enormous number of potentially possible interactions. Here, we report a novel hybrid mathematical modeling strategy to systematically unravel hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulated phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, which critically contribute to liver regeneration. By combining time-resolved quantitative experimental data generated in primary mouse hepatocytes with interaction graph and ordinary differential equation modeling, we identify and experimentally validate a network structure that represents the experimental data best and indicates specific crosstalk mechanisms. Whereas the identified network is robust against single perturbations, combinatorial inhibition strategies are predicted that result in strong reduction of Akt and ERK activation. Thus, by capitalizing on the advantages of the two modeling approaches, we reduce the high combinatorial complexity and identify cell-context specific signaling networks.

Authors: L. A. D'Alessandro, R. Samaga, T. Maiwald, S. H. Rho, S. Bonefas, A. Raue, N. Iwamoto, A. Kienast, K. Waldow, R. Meyer, M. Schilling, J. Timmer, S. Klamt, U. Klingmuller

Date Published: 24th Apr 2015

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

STAT5A and STAT5B are important transcription factors that dimerize and transduce activation signals of cytokine receptors directly to the nucleus. A typical cytokine that mediates STAT5 activation is erythropoietin (Epo). Differential functions of STAT5A and STAT5B have been reported. However, the extent to which phosphorylated STAT5A and STAT5B (pSTAT5A, pSTAT5B) form homo- or heterodimers is not understood, nor is how this might influence the signal transmission to the nucleus. To study this, we designed a concept to investigate the isoform-specific dimerization behavior of pSTAT5A and pSTAT5B that comprises isoform-specific immunoprecipitation (IP), measurement of the degree of phosphorylation, and isoform ratio determination between STAT5A and STAT5B. For the main analytical method, we employed quantitative label-free and -based mass spectrometry. For the cellular model system, we used Epo receptor (EpoR)-expressing BaF3 cells (BaF3-EpoR) stimulated with Epo. Three hypotheses of dimer formation between pSTAT5A and pSTAT5B were used to explain the analytical results by a static mathematical model: formation of (i) homodimers only, (ii) heterodimers only, and (iii) random formation of homo- and heterodimers. The best agreement between experimental data and model simulations was found for the last case. Dynamics of cytoplasmic STAT5 dimerization could be explained by distinct nuclear import rates and individual nuclear retention for homo- and heterodimers of phosphorylated STAT5.

Authors: M. E. Boehm, L. Adlung, M. Schilling, S. Roth, U. Klingmuller, W. D. Lehmann

Date Published: 5th Dec 2014

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) possess broad immunomodulatory capacities that are currently investigated for potential clinical application in treating autoimmune disorders. Third-party MSCs suppress alloantigen-induced proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells providing the rationale for clinical use in graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). We confirmed that MSCs strongly inhibited proliferation of CD8(+) T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, MSCs also suppressed proliferation of T cells specifically recognizing cytomegalovirus (CMV) and influenza virus. Inhibition was dose dependent, but independent of the culture medium. MSCs inhibited proliferation of specific CD8(+) T cells and the release of IFN-gamma by specific CD8(+) T cells for immunodominant HLA-A2- and HLA-B7- restricted antigen epitopes derived from CMV phosphoprotein 65 and influenza matrix protein. This is in contrast to a recently reported scenario where MSCs exert differential effects on alloantigen and virus-specific T cells potentially having an impact on surveillance and prophylaxis of patients treated by MSCs.

Authors: G. Malcherek, N. Jin, A. G. Huckelhoven, J. Mani, L. Wang, U. Gern, A. Diehlmann, P. Wuchter, A. Schmitt, B. Chen, A. D. Ho, M. Schmitt

Date Published: 18th Sep 2014

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND AIMS: Human mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs) represent a potential resource not only for regenerative medicine but also for immunomodulatory cell therapies. The application of different MSC culture protocols has significantly hampered the comparability of experimental and clinical data from different laboratories and has posed a major obstacle for multicenter clinical trials. Manufacturing of cell products for clinical application in the European Community must be conducted in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice and requires a manufacturing license. In Germany, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut as the Federal Authority for Vaccines and Biomedicines is critically involved in the approval process. METHODS: This report summarizes a consensus meeting between researchers, clinicians and regulatory experts on standard quality requirements for MSC production. RESULTS: The strategy for quality control testing depends on the product's cell composition, the manufacturing process and the indication and target patient population. Important quality criteria in this sense are, among others, the immunophenotype of the cells, composition of the culture medium and the risk for malignant transformation, as well as aging and the immunosuppressive potential of the manufactured MSCs. CONCLUSIONS: This position paper intends to provide relevant information to interested parties regarding these criteria to foster the development of scientifically valid and harmonized quality standards and to support approval of MSC-based investigational medicinal products.

Authors: P. Wuchter, K. Bieback, H. Schrezenmeier, M. Bornhauser, L. P. Muller, H. Bonig, W. Wagner, R. Meisel, P. Pavel, T. Tonn, P. Lang, I. Muller, M. Renner, G. Malcherek, R. Saffrich, E. C. Buss, P. Horn, M. Rojewski, A. Schmitt, A. D. Ho, R. Sanzenbacher, M. Schmitt

Date Published: 27th May 2014

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

The interaction between the stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1alpha, CXCL12) and its chemokine receptor CXCR4 has been reported to regulate stem cell migration, mobilization and homing. The CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor is highly efficient in mobilizing hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). However, the precise regulatory mechanisms governing the CXCR4/SDF-1alpha axis between the bone marrow niche and HPCs remain unclear. In this study, we quantify the impact of plerixafor on the interaction between human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and human CD34+ HPCs. An assessment of SDF-1alpha levels in the supernatant of MSC cultures revealed that exposure to plerixafor led to a transient increase but had no long-term effect. In Transwell experiments, we observed that the addition of SDF-1alpha significantly stimulated HPC migration; this stimulation was almost completely antagonized by the addition of plerixafor, confirming the direct impact of the CXCR4/SDF-1alpha interaction on the migration capacity of HPCs. We also developed a new microstructural niche model to determine the chemotactic sensitivity of HPCs. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that HPCs migrated actively along an SDF-1alpha gradient within the microchannels and the quantitative assessment of the required minimum gradient initiating this chemotaxis revealed a surprisingly high sensitivity of HPCs. These data demonstrate the fine-tuned balance of the CXCR4/SDF-1alpha axis and the synergistic effects of plerixafor on HPCs and MSCs, which most likely represent the key mechanisms for the consecutive mobilization of HPCs from the bone marrow niche into the circulating blood.

Authors: P. Wuchter, C. Leinweber, R. Saffrich, M. Hanke, V. Eckstein, A. D. Ho, M. Grunze, A. Rosenhahn

Date Published: 17th Dec 2013

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

We previously demonstrated that leukemia cell lines expressing CD44 and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) from umbilical cord blood (CB) showed rolling on hyaluronic acid (HA)-coated surfaces under physiological shear stress. In the present study, we quantitatively assessed the interaction of HPC derived from CB, mobilized peripheral blood (mPB) and bone marrow (BM) from healthy donors, as well as primary leukemia blasts from PB and BM of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with HA. We have demonstrated that HPC derived from healthy donors showed relative homogeneous rolling and adhesion to HA. In contrast, highly diverse behavioral patterns were found for leukemia blasts under identical conditions. The monoclonal CD44 antibody (clone BU52) abrogated the shear stress-induced rolling of HPC and leukemia blasts, confirming the significance of CD44 in this context. On the other hand, the immobile adhesion of leukemia blasts to the HA-coated surface was, in some cases, not or incompletely inhibited by BU52. The latter property was associated with non-responsiveness to induction chemotherapy and subsequently poor clinical outcome.

Authors: M. Hanke, I. Hoffmann, C. Christophis, M. Schubert, V. T. Hoang, A. Zepeda-Moreno, N. Baran, V. Eckstein, P. Wuchter, A. Rosenhahn, A. D. Ho

Date Published: 26th Nov 2013

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND AIMS: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) resemble an essential component of the bone marrow niche for maintenance of stemness of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Perturbation of the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)/stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) axis by plerixafor (AMD3100) mobilizes HPCs from their niche; however, little is known about how plerixafor affects interaction of HPCs and MSCs in vitro. METHODS: We monitored cell division kinetics, surface expression of CD34 and CXCR4, migration behavior and colony-forming frequency of HPCs on co-culture with MSCs either with or without exposure to plerixafor. RESULTS: Co-culture with MSCs significantly accelerated cell division kinetics of HPCs. Despite this, the proportion of CD34(+) cells was significantly increased on co-culture, whereas the expression of CXCR4 was reduced. In addition, co-culture with MSCs led to significantly higher colony-forming capacity and enhanced migration rate of HPCs compared with mono-culture conditions. The composition of MSC sub-populations-and conversely their hematopoiesis supportive functions-may be influenced by culture conditions. We compared the stromal function of MSCs isolated with three different culture media. Overall, the supporting potentials of these MSC preparations were quite similar. Perturbation by the CXCR4-antagonist plerixafor reduced the cell division kinetics of HPCs on co-culture with MSCs. However, the progenitor cell potential of the HPCs as reflected by colony-forming capacity was not affected by plerixafor. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the notion that the CXCR4/SDF-1alpha axis is critical for HPC-MSC interaction with regard to migration, adhesion and regulation of proliferation but not for maintenance of primitive progenitor cells.

Authors: A. Ludwig, R. Saffrich, V. Eckstein, T. Bruckner, W. Wagner, A. D. Ho, P. Wuchter

Date Published: 15th Oct 2013

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract

Not specified

Authors: M. Schmitt, L. P. Muller, G. Keysser, H. M. Lorenz, A. D. Ho, P. Wuchter

Date Published: 6th Sep 2013

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

In systems biology, quantitative experimental data is the basis of building mathematical models. In most of the cases, they are stored in Excel files and hosted locally. To have a public database for collecting, retrieving and citing experimental raw data as well as experimental conditions is important for both experimentalists and modelers. However, the great effort needed in the data handling procedure and in the data submission procedure becomes the crucial limitation for experimentalists to contribute to a database, thereby impeding the database to deliver its benefit. Moreover, manual copy and paste operations which are commonly used in those procedures increase the chance of making mistakes. Excemplify, a web-based application, proposes a flexible and adaptable template-based solution to solve these problems. Comparing to the normal template based uploading approach, which is supported by some public databases, rather than predefining a format that is potentiall impractical, Excemplify allows users to create their own experiment-specific content templates in different experiment stages and to build corresponding knowledge bases for parsing. Utilizing the embedded knowledge of used templates, Excemplify is able to parse experimental data from the initial setup stage and generate following stages spreadsheets automatically. The proposed solution standardizes the flows of data traveling according to the standard procedures of applying the experiment, cuts down the amount of manual effort and reduces the chance of mistakes caused by manual data handling. In addition, it maintains the context of meta-data from the initial preparation manuscript and improves the data consistency. It interoperates and complements RightField and SEEK as well.

Authors: L. Shi, L. Jong, U. Wittig, P. Lucarelli, M. Stepath, S. Mueller, L. A. D'Alessandro, U. Klingmuller, W. Muller

Date Published: 3rd Apr 2013

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

SABIO-RK (http://sabio.h-its.org/) is a web-accessible database storing comprehensive information about biochemical reactions and their kinetic properties. SABIO-RK offers standardized data manually extracted from the literature and data directly submitted from lab experiments. The database content includes kinetic parameters in relation to biochemical reactions and their biological sources with no restriction on any particular set of organisms. Additionally, kinetic rate laws and corresponding equations as well as experimental conditions are represented. All the data are manually curated and annotated by biological experts, supported by automated consistency checks. SABIO-RK can be accessed via web-based user interfaces or automatically via web services that allow direct data access by other tools. Both interfaces support the export of the data together with its annotations in SBML (Systems Biology Markup Language), e.g. for import in modelling tools.

Authors: Ulrike Wittig, , Martin Golebiewski, , Lei Shi, Lenneke Jong, Enkhjargal Algaa, Andreas Weidemann, Heidrun Sauer-Danzwith, Saqib Mir, , Meik Bittkowski, Elina Wetsch, ,

Date Published: 22nd Nov 2011

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

Cell surface receptors convert extracellular cues into receptor activation, thereby triggering intracellular signaling networks and controlling cellular decisions. A major unresolved issue is the identification of receptor properties that critically determine processing of ligand-encoded information. We show by mathematical modeling of quantitative data and experimental validation that rapid ligand depletion and replenishment of the cell surface receptor are characteristic features of the erythropoietin (Epo) receptor (EpoR). The amount of Epo-EpoR complexes and EpoR activation integrated over time corresponds linearly to ligand input; this process is carried out over a broad range of ligand concentrations. This relation depends solely on EpoR turnover independent of ligand binding, which suggests an essential role of large intracellular receptor pools. These receptor properties enable the system to cope with basal and acute demand in the hematopoietic system.

Authors: V. Becker, M. Schilling, J. Bachmann, U. Baumann, A. Raue, T. Maiwald, J. Timmer, U. Klingmuller

Date Published: 11th Jun 2010

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

High-quality quantitative data generated under standardized conditions is critical for understanding dynamic cellular processes. We report strategies for error reduction, and algorithms for automated data processing and for establishing the widely used techniques of immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting as highly precise methods for the quantification of protein levels and modifications. To determine the stoichiometry of cellular components and to ensure comparability of experiments, relative signals are converted to absolute values. A major source for errors in blotting techniques are inhomogeneities of the gel and the transfer procedure leading to correlated errors. These correlations are prevented by randomized gel loading, which significantly reduces standard deviations. Further error reduction is achieved by using housekeeping proteins as normalizers or by adding purified proteins in immunoprecipitations as calibrators in combination with criteria-based normalization. Additionally, we developed a computational tool for automated normalization, validation and integration of data derived from multiple immunoblots. In this way, large sets of quantitative data for dynamic pathway modeling can be generated, enabling the identification of systems properties and the prediction of targets for efficient intervention.

Authors: M. Schilling, T. Maiwald, S. Bohl, M. Kollmann, C. Kreutz, J. Timmer, U. Klingmuller

Date Published: 13th Dec 2005

Publication Type: Journal

Abstract (Expand)

We used parameter scanning to emulate changes to the limiting rate for steps in a fitted model of glucose-derepressed yeast glycolysis. Three flux-control regimes were observed, two of which were under the dominant control of hexose transport, in accordance with various experimental studies and other model predictions. A third control regime in which phosphofructokinase exerted dominant glycolytic flux control was also found, but it appeared to be physiologically unreachable by this model, and all realistically obtainable flux control regimes featured hexose transport as a step involving high flux control.

Authors: L. Pritchard, D. B. Kell

Date Published: 16th Aug 2002

Publication Type: Journal

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