Structural Genomics of SARS-CoV-2 Indicates Evolutionary Conserved Functional Regions of Viral Proteins

Abstract:

During its first two and a half months, the recently emerged 2019 novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, has already infected over one-hundred thousand people worldwide and has taken more than four thousand lives. However, the swiftly spreading virus also caused an unprecedentedly rapid response from the research community facing the unknown health challenge of potentially enormous proportions. Unfortunately, the experimental research to understand the molecular mechanisms behind the viral infection and to design a vaccine or antivirals is costly and takes months to develop. To expedite the advancement of our knowledge, we leveraged data about the related coronaviruses that is readily available in public databases and integrated these data into a single computational pipeline. As a result, we provide comprehensive structural genomics and interactomics roadmaps of SARS-CoV-2 and use this information to infer the possible functional differences and similarities with the related SARS coronavirus. All data are made publicly available to the research community.

SEEK ID: https://fairdomhub.org/publications/525

DOI: 10.3390/v12040360

Projects: COVID-19 Disease Map

Publication type: Journal

Journal: Viruses

Citation: Viruses 12(4):360

Date Published: 1st Apr 2020

URL: https://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/12/4/360

Registered Mode: imported from a bibtex file

Authors: Suhas Srinivasan, Hongzhu Cui, Ziyang Gao, Ming Liu, Senbao Lu, Winnie Mkandawire, Oleksandr Narykov, Mo Sun, Dmitry Korkin

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Srinivasan, S., Cui, H., Gao, Z., Liu, M., Lu, S., Mkandawire, W., Narykov, O., Sun, M., & Korkin, D. (2020). Structural Genomics of SARS-CoV-2 Indicates Evolutionary Conserved Functional Regions of Viral Proteins. Viruses, 12(4), 360. https://doi.org/10.3390/v12040360
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Created: 8th Apr 2020 at 22:14

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